10 Herbs for Prevention and Treatment of Colds and Flus

Traditional chinese herbal medicine ingredients, close-up

Researching herbs has temporarily taken over my life. Because I’m currently writing a tea guide, I’m inundated with amazing facts about an enormous amount of medicinal herbs. Yesterday I spent about two hours researching herbs that expel worms and kill lice.

(Aaaaaaand I’m still itchy. *Shudder…)

Since we’re smack in the middle of winter and surrounded by colds and flus, I decided to share what I’ve learned about herbs that help with both prevention and symptoms of viruses that are running around, rearing their ugly heads.

Here are 10 herbs that everyone should have on hand from October to March:

Ginseng tea

  1. Ginseng: to stimulate the immune system, fight upper respiratory tract infections, prevent the flu when taken consistently, and decrease susceptibility to colds.[1] Take as a tea or in capsule form.

Echinacea Flowers homeopathic remedy

  1. Echinacea: Shortens severity of colds when taken as soon as symptoms emerge.[2] Take as a tea or in capsule form.

lemon

  1. Lemon: to kill viruses and bacteria, fight infections, and boost the immune system. Lemon also contains extremely high levels of vitamin C.[3] Squeeze half of a fresh lemon in hot water and drink 2-3 times per day.

Bundle Of Fresh Thyme

  1. Thyme: to kill viruses and bacteria, relieve a cough, and lessen inflammation. Take as a tea.[4]

Medicinal Herbal Tea

  1. Marshmallow: to soothe a sore throat and suppress a cough. Take as tea or in capsule form.[5]

Mint tea

  1. Peppermint: for sore throats, chest and sinus congestion, and nausea. Try sipping peppermint tea, and mixing a few drops of the essential oil in lotion to rub on sore, achy muscles.[6]

Eucalyptus Tea

  1. Eucalyptus: for chest and sinus congestion. Place a few drops of this essential oil in a hot bath.[7]

Ginger Tea homeopathic remedy

  1. Ginger: for nausea, vomiting, treating inflammation, and relieving chills.[8] Take as a tea.

Plantain Tea

  1. Plantain: to soothe a cough, and relieve inflammation.[9] Take as a tea.

Cinnamon

  1. Cinnamon: to kill bacteria, relieve chills and aches, and relieve inflammation.[10] Take as a tea or in capsule form.

So there you have it! Stock up and be well. xo

References:

[1] Predy, Gerald N. et al. “Efficacy of an extract of North American ginseng containing poly-furanosyl-pyranosyl-saccharides for preventing upper respiratory tract infections: a randomized controlled trial.” Pubmed. Web. 2005. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1266327/?tool=pubmed

[2] Block KI, Mead MN. “Immune system effects of echinacea, ginseng, and astragalus: a review.” Pubmed. Web. 2003. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15035888

[3] “Lemon (Fruit).” HerbWisdom.com. Web. 2015. http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-lemon.html

[4] Zohra Ashpari. “The Best Natural Cough Remedies.” Healthline. Web. 2014. http://www.healthline.com/health/allergies/best-natural-cough-remedies#2

[5] Zohra Ashpari. “The Best Natural Cough Remedies.” Healthline. Web. 2014. http://www.healthline.com/health/allergies/best-natural-cough-remedies#2

[6] Zohra Ashpari. “The Best Natural Cough Remedies.” Healthline. Web. 2014. http://www.healthline.com/health/allergies/best-natural-cough-remedies#2

[7] Zohra Ashpari. “The Best Natural Cough Remedies.” Healthline. Web. 2014. http://www.healthline.com/health/allergies/best-natural-cough-remedies#2

[8] Ann M. Bode and Zigang Dong. “The Amazing and Mighty Ginger.” (Chapter 7.) Pubmed. Web. 2011. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK92775/

[9] Wegener and Kraft K. “Plantain (Plantago lanceolata L.): anti-inflammatory action in upper respiratory tract infections.” Pubmed. Web. 1999. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10483683

[10] Joung-Woo Hong et al. “Anti-inflammatory activity of cinnamon water extract in vivo and in vitro LPS-induced models.” Pubmed. Web. 2012. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3533872/

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